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if is a weepin' and a moaning and a knashin' of teet

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21 Sometimes the cloud stayed only from evening till morning, and when it lifted in the morning, they set out. Whether by day or by night, whenever the cloud lifted, they set out. 22 Whether the cloud stayed over the tabernacle for two days or a month or a year, the Israelites would remain in camp and not set out; but when it lifted, they would set out. 23 At the Lord’s command they encamped, and at the Lord’s command they set out. They obeyed the Lord’s order, in accordance with his command through Moses.
Numbers 9: 21-23

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obitoftheday:

Obit of the Day (Historical): Sen. Hiram Revels (1901)
Hiram Revels was born a free man, which was unheard of for anyone of African descent in 19th century North Carolina. Educated by a private tutor, even though it was illegal in his home state for a black child to receive an education, Mr. Revels was given all the advantages his mother and father could provide.
He headed north to attended seminary and became an African Methodist Episcopal (AME) pastor. It was during this time that he married Phoebe Bass, a free black woman from Ohio, and then began his intinerant preaching career.
The Revels traveled through several states including stops in Indiana, Illinois, Kansas, Kentucky, and Missouri to set up churches and preach to free and enslaved congregants. In Missouri, where it was illegal for free blacks to live because of a fear of inciting riots, Mr. Revels set up an AME church in St. Louis in 1853. A year later he was arrested for preaching to a black congregation.
Following his release he received a commission to serve at an AME church in Baltimore, Maryland where he stayed until the beginning of the Civil War in 1861. Once hostilities broke out between the North and the South, Mr. Revels helped to recruit two all-black regiments and became an Army chaplain seeing action in Mississippi in Jackson and Vicksburg.
Following the war, Mr. Revels and his family moved to Natchez, Mississippi where he worked not only as a pastor but to build schools provide other resources for newly freed slaves. His success in this area led to his recruitment into Mississippi state politics by John R. Lynch, the first black Speaker of the House in the state’s history.
In 1868, Mr. Revels was elected to the Mississippi State Senate. According to stories, Mr. Revels elevated his status amongst his colleagues with an opening prayer for the body in January 1869. (There are no copies of the prayer to be found during my research for this post.) Mr. Lynch said that the prayer helped earn Mr. Revels election to the U.S. Senate.
In 1870, it was decided to appoint two new U.S. Senators to the seats left vacant by the resignations of Albert Brown and Jefferson Davis in 1861 upon the secession of Mississippi. One seat was set to expire in 1871, the other in 1875. In a compromise between Republicans and Democrats it was agreed that a black candidate would be appointed to Sen. Brown’s vacancy, set to expire a year later, while a white candidate would be placed in Sen. Davis’ seat. In January 1870, Hiram Revels was chosen as the first black U.S. Senator in American history.
At the end of the month, Mr. Revels traveled to Washington, D.C. to take his seat. First he had to wait until Mississippi was re-admitted to the Union, which happened in February 1870. Then he presented his letter of appointment to the Senate on February 23, 1870. But Democrats in the chamber held up his appointment.
According to Article I, Section 3, Clause 3, to be a U.S. Senator you must be at least 30 years of age and a citizen for at least nine years. Democrats argued that the 1857 Dred Scott decision by the U.S. Supreme Court declared that blacks were not citizens. Therefore Mr. Revels only became a citizen after the passage of either the 1866 Civil Rights Act or the 14th Amendment to the Consitution in 1868. Either way, Mr. Revels was not a citizen for nine years.
Republicans argued that Mr. Revels was, in fact, a citizen who voted in elections in Ohio, and regardless the Civil War and its results gave all black men and women rights as citizens retroactively from their birth in the United States.
On February 25, 1870, with a 48-8 vote (every Senate Democrat voted against), Mr. Revels was appointed to the U.S. Senate. During his short term of office Mr. Revels fought for the desegregation of Washington, D.C. schools and pushed for amnesty of all former Confederates willing to take a loyalty oath.
The following year Mr. Revels resigned his Senate seat and took his seat as the first president of Alcorn State University. The university was named for former Confederate officer James L. Alcorn who funded the school in order that blacks in Mississippi would have opportunities for higher education. In fact, Mr. Alcorn*, who served as Republican governor of Mississippi from 1870 to 1871, was selected to replaced Mr. Revels in the U.S. Senate. (Later Mr. Revels would support Mr. Alcorn in another run for governor in 1873 against Radical Republican and carpetbagger, Albert Ames. When Ames won, Mr. Revels was removed from the presidency of Alcorn State. He regained the position two years later when Democrats regained control of the state legislature.) Mr. Revels retired from Alcorn State in 1882.
Hiram Revels died on January 16, 1901 at the age of 73.
Sources: US House of Representatives, US Senate, and Wikipedia
(Image of Hiram Revels, taken between 1860 and 1875 by either Matthew Brady or Levin Handy is in the Library of Congress, LC-BH63-1823, and courtesy of wikimedia.org)
* The only other Confederate officer to join the Republican party after the war was General James Longstreet, who would endorse Ulysses S, Grant for president and even serve as ambassador to the Ottoman Empire.

obitoftheday:

Obit of the Day (Historical): Sen. Hiram Revels (1901)

Hiram Revels was born a free man, which was unheard of for anyone of African descent in 19th century North Carolina. Educated by a private tutor, even though it was illegal in his home state for a black child to receive an education, Mr. Revels was given all the advantages his mother and father could provide.

He headed north to attended seminary and became an African Methodist Episcopal (AME) pastor. It was during this time that he married Phoebe Bass, a free black woman from Ohio, and then began his intinerant preaching career.

The Revels traveled through several states including stops in Indiana, Illinois, Kansas, Kentucky, and Missouri to set up churches and preach to free and enslaved congregants. In Missouri, where it was illegal for free blacks to live because of a fear of inciting riots, Mr. Revels set up an AME church in St. Louis in 1853. A year later he was arrested for preaching to a black congregation.

Following his release he received a commission to serve at an AME church in Baltimore, Maryland where he stayed until the beginning of the Civil War in 1861. Once hostilities broke out between the North and the South, Mr. Revels helped to recruit two all-black regiments and became an Army chaplain seeing action in Mississippi in Jackson and Vicksburg.

Following the war, Mr. Revels and his family moved to Natchez, Mississippi where he worked not only as a pastor but to build schools provide other resources for newly freed slaves. His success in this area led to his recruitment into Mississippi state politics by John R. Lynch, the first black Speaker of the House in the state’s history.

In 1868, Mr. Revels was elected to the Mississippi State Senate. According to stories, Mr. Revels elevated his status amongst his colleagues with an opening prayer for the body in January 1869. (There are no copies of the prayer to be found during my research for this post.) Mr. Lynch said that the prayer helped earn Mr. Revels election to the U.S. Senate.

In 1870, it was decided to appoint two new U.S. Senators to the seats left vacant by the resignations of Albert Brown and Jefferson Davis in 1861 upon the secession of Mississippi. One seat was set to expire in 1871, the other in 1875. In a compromise between Republicans and Democrats it was agreed that a black candidate would be appointed to Sen. Brown’s vacancy, set to expire a year later, while a white candidate would be placed in Sen. Davis’ seat. In January 1870, Hiram Revels was chosen as the first black U.S. Senator in American history.

At the end of the month, Mr. Revels traveled to Washington, D.C. to take his seat. First he had to wait until Mississippi was re-admitted to the Union, which happened in February 1870. Then he presented his letter of appointment to the Senate on February 23, 1870. But Democrats in the chamber held up his appointment.

According to Article I, Section 3, Clause 3, to be a U.S. Senator you must be at least 30 years of age and a citizen for at least nine years. Democrats argued that the 1857 Dred Scott decision by the U.S. Supreme Court declared that blacks were not citizens. Therefore Mr. Revels only became a citizen after the passage of either the 1866 Civil Rights Act or the 14th Amendment to the Consitution in 1868. Either way, Mr. Revels was not a citizen for nine years.

Republicans argued that Mr. Revels was, in fact, a citizen who voted in elections in Ohio, and regardless the Civil War and its results gave all black men and women rights as citizens retroactively from their birth in the United States.

On February 25, 1870, with a 48-8 vote (every Senate Democrat voted against), Mr. Revels was appointed to the U.S. Senate. During his short term of office Mr. Revels fought for the desegregation of Washington, D.C. schools and pushed for amnesty of all former Confederates willing to take a loyalty oath.

The following year Mr. Revels resigned his Senate seat and took his seat as the first president of Alcorn State University. The university was named for former Confederate officer James L. Alcorn who funded the school in order that blacks in Mississippi would have opportunities for higher education. In fact, Mr. Alcorn*, who served as Republican governor of Mississippi from 1870 to 1871, was selected to replaced Mr. Revels in the U.S. Senate. (Later Mr. Revels would support Mr. Alcorn in another run for governor in 1873 against Radical Republican and carpetbagger, Albert Ames. When Ames won, Mr. Revels was removed from the presidency of Alcorn State. He regained the position two years later when Democrats regained control of the state legislature.) Mr. Revels retired from Alcorn State in 1882.

Hiram Revels died on January 16, 1901 at the age of 73.

Sources: US House of Representatives, US Senate, and Wikipedia

(Image of Hiram Revels, taken between 1860 and 1875 by either Matthew Brady or Levin Handy is in the Library of Congress, LC-BH63-1823, and courtesy of wikimedia.org)

* The only other Confederate officer to join the Republican party after the war was General James Longstreet, who would endorse Ulysses S, Grant for president and even serve as ambassador to the Ottoman Empire.

(via knowledgeequalsblackpower)

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beautiesofafrique:

Uganda gay pride party after anti-homosexual law is overturned

Entebbe (Uganda) (AFP) - Dancing and waving rainbow-coloured flags, Ugandan activists held their first gay pride rally Saturday since the overturning of a tough anti-homosexuality law, which authorities have appealed. ”This event is to bring us together. Everyone was in hiding before because of the anti-homosexuality law,” organiser Sandra Ntebi told AFP. "It is a happy day for all of us, getting together,” Ntebi said, noting that police had granted permission for the invitation-only “Uganda Pride” rally. The overturned law, condemned as “abominable” by rights groups but popular among many Ugandans, called for proven homosexuals to be jailed for life.

The constitutional court threw it out on a technicality on August 1, six months after it took effect, and the government swiftly filed an appeal, while lawmakers have signed a petition for a new vote on the bill.

Homosexuality remains illegal in Uganda, punishable by a jail sentence. But it is no longer illegal to promote homosexuality, and Ugandans are no longer obliged to denounce gays to the authorities

Amid music and laughter, activists gathered at botanical gardens on the shores of Lake Victoria, barely a kilometre (half a mile) from the presidential palace at Entebbe, a key town some 35 kilometres from the capital Kampala. ”Some Ugandans are gay. Get over it,” read one sticker a man had pasted onto his face. - ‘Now I have the courage’ -

Ugandan Deputy Attorney General Fred Ruhinda said Saturday that state lawyers had lodged an appeal against the ruling at the Supreme Court, the country’s highest court.

"We are unsatisfied with the court ruling," Ruhinda told AFP. "The law was not intended to victimise gay people, it was for the common good." In their surprise ruling last week, judges said it had been passed without the necessary quorum of lawmakers in parliament. Rights groups said the law triggered a sharp increase in arrests and assaults on members of the country’s lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community.

Homophobia is widespread in Uganda, where American-style evangelical Christianity is on the rise. Gay men and women face frequent harassment and threats of violence. On Saturday, however, activists celebrated openly.

"Since I discovered I was gay I feared coming out, but now I have the courage after the law was thrown out," Alex Musoke told AFP, one of more than 100 people at the event. One pair of activists waved a rainbow flag with a slogan appealing for people to “join hands” to end the “genocide” of homosexuals. Some wore masks for fear of being identified — Uganda’s tabloid newspapers have previously printed photographs of prominent activists — while others showed their faces openly and wore colourful fancy dress. But activist Pepe Onziema said he and his colleagues would not rest until they were sure the law was gone for good. ”Uganda is giving a bad example, not only to the region but to the world, by insisting on this law,” he said.

"We are Africans, we want to show an African struggle by civil society."

There was little police presence, and no one came to protest the celebration, even if many in the town said they did not approve."This is unbelievable, I can’t imagine being a gay," said motorbike taxi driver William Kamurasi in disgust."It’s a shame to Uganda. Police must stop these activities of the gays."

- Lawmakers demand new vote -

Critics said President Yoweri Museveni signed the law to win domestic support ahead of a presidential election set for 2016, which will be his 30th year in power. But it lost him friends abroad, with several international donors freezing or redirecting millions of dollars of government aid, saying the country had violated human rights and democratic principles.

US Secretary of State John Kerry likened the law to anti-Semitic legislation in Nazi Germany.

Analysts suggest that Museveni secretly encouraged last week’s court ruling as it provided a way to avoid the appearance of caving in to foreign pressure. But gay rights activists warn the battle is not over.

Lawmakers signed a petition calling for a new vote on the bill, and to bypass parliamentary rules that require it be formally reintroduced from scratch — a process that could take years.

Source

(via knowledgeequalsblackpower)

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24 “Father, I want those you have given me to be with me where I am, and to see my glory, the glory you have given me because you loved me before the creation of the world.

25 “Righteous Father, though the world does not know you, I know you, and they know that you have sent me. 26 I have made you[a] known to them, and will continue to make you known in order that the love you have for me may be in them and that I myself may be in them.”

John 17: 24-25

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